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Esval Models 1:43 1953 Kaiser-Frazer Carolina 2 Door Sedan, Yellow

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$89.95
SKU:
J4-4-5-047B
UPC:
0757347351103
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Esval Models 1:43 1953 Kaiser-Frazer Carolina 2 Door Sedan, Yellow

Esval Models 1:43 1953 Kaiser-Frazer Carolina 2 Door Sedan, Yellow
$89.95

This resin model is 1 of only 250 pieces produced world wide

The Kaiser-Frazer Corporation (1947–1951 as Kaiser-Frazer) was the result of a partnership between automobile executive Joseph W. Frazer and industrialist Henry J. Kaiser. In 1947, the company acquired the automotive assets of Graham-Paige, of which Frazer had become president near the end of World War II. Kaiser-Frazer was the only new US automaker to achieve success after World War II, if only for a few years. When Frazer left in 1951, the company renamed itself the Kaiser Motors Corporation and continued until 1955.

The company was founded on July 25, 1945 and in 1946 K-F displayed prototypes of their two new cars at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City. The Kaiser was of an advanced front wheel drive design while the Frazer was an upscale conventional rear wheel drive car. The production costs and the limited time available prevented the front wheel drive design from entering production, so the new 1947 Kaiser and Frazer shared bodies and powertrains. Being some of the first newly designed cars on the market while the "Big Three" were still marketing their pre-war designs, the Kaisers and Frazers made an exciting entrance. Kaiser and Frazer continued to share bodies and engines through 1950 with different exterior and interior trim.

Henry Kaiser had no automotive marketing experience; Joseph Frazer did, having held various positions with Packard, GM, Chrysler, and Willys-Overland. Kaiser believed in pressing forward in the face of adversity, while Frazer was more pragmatic. As the market for Kaiser-Frazer products slowed in 1949 with the introduction of new designs from the Big Three, Kaiser pushed for more production, creating an oversupply of cars that took until mid-1950 to sell. Kaiser and Frazer had repeated disagreements on how aggressive production should be until, finally, Joseph Frazer left the company in 1951 and the Frazer nameplate was dropped after a short 10,000 unit production run in 1951 that used up the remaining inventory of the 1949-50 bodies.

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